This Five lettered word (SORRY) does wonders yet we often find it difficult to say. I think that one of the reasons why this word is difficult is because we claim right, too proud, and refuse to see things in another person’s way. Imagine if we can say “I am sorry” when we wrong or offend some one how much stress it could reduce? But we rather make things worse by claiming being right.
Take a look around and see how many people are hurting just because someone feels or felt to say simple “sorry.” Is it worth it? Do we as human beings not knowledgeable enough to know what is good to do? What has happened to “Luke 10:27; And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself”?
Do we still obey this command? Are you always right not to say that you are sorry? How much is this word “sorry?” I am sure that it is cheaper than what we say or do in place of it.
Each time that we read about the prodigal son in Luke 15:11-24, we often see a young man that took his belongings and lavished it. Jesus was not interested in how the man spent his father’s portion of wealth but this; “And the son said unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in thy sight, and am no more worthy to be called thy son verse 21.
Is it not knowing that we have offended some one and apologizing the right thing to do? How come we find this difficult to do? On the other hand, how do you receive an apology? Do you pretend as if you have forgiven only to bring it up again in every available situation? Do you treat an apology as this young man’s father? “22. But the father said to his servants, Bring forth the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet: 23. And bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it; and let us eat, and be merry: 24. For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry (Verses 22-24).”
Remember that we all sin daily yet our Father in heaven forgives us and never to remember them any more. “I, even I, am he that blotteth out thy transgressions for mine own sake, and will not remember thy sins (Isaiah 43:25).” Will you start doing things this way? There was a song that even said; “Sorry seems to be the hardest word.”
If God can forgive you and remembers any more, you can do the same.
God bless you as you learn to say; I am sorry, forgive and forget

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Comment by Laurence Gilliot on June 10, 2010 at 8:08am
Hi Ukeme,

Interesting blog. There are so many things to say about this topic.

I think one difficult thing to do is to forgive yourself. I think that is why it is hard to say sorry. It means that we accept that we were wrong and we have to forgive ourself for that. Sometimes the regrets are so strong that we cannot face them, so we prefer to think that we were right.

Our ego is often in the way. Ego in the large sense of the term: the ego that makes us think that we are separate from the others, that we have to be better and stronger. Our ego loves to be right because it reaffirms its existence. Ego makes us suffer a lot. So, if we can recognize the ego in us and smile at the ego, it will loose its power over us. Eckhart Tolle explains it beautifully in 'A new earth', for those who want to read more about it.

I'll stop now. Thanks for reminding is to be humble and to forgive ourselves.

Laurence

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