People get involved from their heart through SALT home visits

This blog has contributions from four NGO staff members of Geneva Global Project

  1. 1.     By Santosh Kumar, Allahabad, TIP India

I work with communities on issues around bonded labour, child labour and trafficking. I am a SALT Facilitator. I use SALT both for group meetings as well as during home visits in the communities. I think the importance of home visits is that individuals who do not share their very personal feeling in the public open up when we visit them in their homes. SALT is important here. As we listen attentively and with full interest, they feel that someone is listening to them. They have something important to share. 

  1. 2.     By Subedar, PGS, Allahabad, India

I work with communities on issues around bonded labour, child labour and trafficking. I too started using  SALT recently. What we did was that before the community group meeting we did SALT home visits in Village Kataha, Shankargarh, Allahabad. We appreciated the community members and listened to them and invited them for our group meeting. We were not expecting many people in the meeting as the village has several problems like shortage of drinking water. It was surprising that all people turned up for the meeting. They not only attended the meeting but shared in detailed. When they arrived many of them said what they could do but later when we heard stories of what they were proud we were impressed by what they had done in their lives. Adolescent girls who usually keep quiet in such meetings also opened up and so did the women. 

Shakil and Pappu, IDF, Bihar, India
I am part of a project on modern slavery and am also using SALT to build ownership of communities in systemic participatory action research. As part of our regular IDF work we do household visits but we have been using SALT with individual families. We asked them two questions one was what are they proud of and what are their hopes and concerns regarding them as individuals, for their family and for their village. Earlier when our team used to do household visit, they would just talk about IDF work. Now with SALT, people who are usually quiet in public meetings are opening up in thier homes and even sharing about extremely sensitive issues. Community members have also started taking lead in doing home visits.  Pappu notes "Yesterday the lady said that she will not share in community meetings as others might laugh at her. She is more open to sharing at home."

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Comment by Marie Lamboray on July 1, 2016 at 4:34pm

Traduction d'extrait des témoignages de personnes travaillant dans des ONGs investies dans la lutte contre le travail forcé, le travail des enfants et le traffic d'êtres humains:

SALT est important ici. Comme nous écoutons attentivement et avec intérêt, ils [les membres des communautés] sentent que quelqu'un les écoute. Ils ont quelque chose d'important à partager.

Santosh Kumar, TIP, Allahabad, Inde


Les adolescentes qui gardent généralement le silence dans ces réunions ont également parlé, ainsi que les femmes.

Subedar Singh, PGS, Allahabad, Inde

Nous leur avons posé deux questions : de quoi sont-ils fiers et quels sont leurs espoirs et leurs préoccupations en tant qu'individus, pour leur famille et pour leur village. Avant, lorsque notre équipe effectuait des visites à domicile, nous parlions uniquement du travail de la FID. Maintenant, avec SALT, les gens qui généralement se taisent dans les réunions publiques, nous reçoivent chez eux et s’ouvrent à nous. Ils partagent même leur point de vue sur des questions extrêmement sensibles. Les membres de la communauté commencent eux-mêmes à faire des visites à domicile.

Shakil et Pappu, FID, Bihar, Inde

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